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30 Day Lip Challenge: Days 19-22

Good morning,

So, this week, I unfortunately was hit with a pretty bad flu. I think my art suffered for it. I got some toned paper, but the oil paint doesn’t really translate well to it.

I actually thought about not posting these since are definitely not the best I can do, but I once heard some wise advice that you should not be afraid to do something you need to do, even if it’s doing it badly. This was important lesson in what not to do as much as what to do.

  1. Don’t paint directly on paper.
  2. Angle features better. It’s easy to just paint things flat.
  3. Don’t mix burnt umber/ cadmium red/ flake white. They muddy up very quickly
  4. Do not work on a big important project when you’re really sick. As much as not painting might be killing you, your quality will suffer for it.

Day 19: Old Master

girl with a pear earring
Image from Wikipedia

vernear

Day 20: Child Lips

So, full disclosure, I didn’t paint these lips on Day 20. I was too sick to paint on Day 20, but I actually painted these on the same day as Day 21, the Woman’s lips.

child

Day 21: Woman’s Lips

woman

Day 22: Man’s Lips

So, since it became clear that the paper wasn’t working, I used a canvas panel I used in the past for a previous exercise. And again, I wanted to paint a beard. Nick Offerman’s Beard to be exact.

 

nick_offerman_2018_(cropped)2
Image from Wikipedia

nick offerman

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30 Day Lip Challenge: Day 8/ Old Master Studies

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For this entry, I drew four lips from Old Master paintings. The reason why I included an exercise involving Old Master art is because I believe studying their techniques helps improve your art style. You can almost see how they held their pencils, what colors they used, and how they achieved a semi-realistic image.

I drew lips from Boticelli’s Venus, Bougereau’s Young Girl in ProfileJohn Singer Sargent’s Jean Joseph Marie Carries, and Da Vinci’s Self Portrait sketch. I thought about drawing something by Van Gogh, but then I decided against it because as much fun as that would be, that’s not the direction I want my portrait style to go.

 

little girl
So, no side by side because the image is in a private collection and copy-righted, but you can see the original here. 

So, some reflections. I did this on my lunch break, in the middle of the day, so it was a nice break away from work. I also need to get an actual printer/scanner at some point. My phone takes good pictures, but you can tell it’s a photo on a non-flat sketchbook. If I do this prompt again, I think I’m going to take the original portraits (as long as they’re not copy-righted), and use Photoshop to put the lips I drew over the portraits to keep it fun. Unfortunately, I don’t have the time, but I’m jotting this down so that I remember to do it again or hopefully if you guys are doing this exercise with me, you can do that!

Thanks for following my journey to improve this aspect of the face. Stick around for more!

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I don’t know what to write

I don’t know what to write, so here is the most recent progress of my Springtime Copy:

 

So far, I’ve spent several months working on it a little bit every day. I learned a lot about painting in general by doing this. I feel like it looks like a child’s drawing when side by side with the original, but that’s okay. I’m still very happy with how it’s turning. It’s not done. I’m taking a break from it to work on some original artwork (finally), but I just wanted to show you my progress.

Also, How to Fight Writer’s Block: Just type “I don’t know what to write…” and see what comes after.

 

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Why I Copy

Hey all,

Since I’ve returned home from Italy, I’ve finally gotten into a routine that involves small self-improvements with bigger goals in mind. Namely, waking up at 5 am and painting for 30 minutes before work, which would inevitably result in gorgeous masterpieces by the end of the month with a total of 15 hours per work of art…

… I hope, anyway. 15 might not be enough. Depends on the artwork I guess.

Into my routine, I’m hoping to do a weekly blog post. Let’s see how long that lasts.

Why do I copy Old Master oil paintings? I’ve been asking myself this question for months.

1. It’s Fun

 

While I was in Italy, one of the things I did consistently make oil reproductions of portraits that I thought were beautiful. They may not have been my original pieces, but as I worked on them, I found that I had a dialogue with the art. I really enjoy doing it. It makes me happy. It’s like finding a new piece and falling in love and all I can think about is getting to know the artwork, and the artist, just a little bit better.

I learned new brushstrokes, found strange quirks and color choices I wouldn’t have picked up just from looking at it, I made mistakes, and learned from them for future pieces.

2. I Learn New Things from Old Geniuses

 

The artists long dead became my mentors, and they taught me more in four hours than I ever did four years of art classes.

I think as artists, we should never stop learning. Even if our style becomes something we’re truly proud of and we don’t think we could ever improve and better our art (and, in extension, ourselves), there’s always something new to learn.

In fact, a couple years ago, I heard about DC Artist, Jorge Jimenez. He regularly posted to his twitter feed art. He loved art, and just talked about art. He tweeted something to the extent of “Great Artists Never Stop Learning”. This almost moved me to tears. At the time, I was more obsessed with trying to create original pieces (not that I made a lot anyway, I just stood there being frustrated). I thought, “Yeah. Why not stop learning?” As a result, I just drew hands, drew more things from life, and tried not to stop learning.

I found that the best way to learn, to quote Newton, was to build on the shoulders of giants. So to speak.

3. My Copies Aren’t Really Copies.

 

Even so, I can’t copy these artists exactly, nor do I want to. I’m not saying that out of a “Sour Grapes” approach that I can’t get that good, but my hands and my brain have their own spark of creativity built from years of knowledge, emotions, and experiences that appear in the art, making them different.

For example, in my copies of Bouguereau’s young girls, I subconsciously made them look like my sisters rather than the girls he was trying to portray. It made me wonder if his paintings really looked as much like his models, or if there was something in his own mind that changed them.

4. Maybe a Sense of Spiteful Rebellion

Dear Post-Modernist loving professors,

Get. Off. My. Back!

Just let me enjoy historical art, for Christ’s sake! Take this checklist you’ve shoved down my throat of “Patriarchy, Male Gaze, Marxist Deconstructionisticnonesense” and shove it up your-”

5. It’s a Calming Meditation

 

Copying isn’t just copying. It’s really a puzzle that you try to solve.

You actually deconstruct the artworks.

When I paint, I deconstruct the people into basic shapes in order to achieve the correct proportions, I deconstruct the colors and try to figure out what other colors brought that particular shade and vibrancy. I deconstruct everything from the face, to the cloth, to flowers, the fur on a dog… It’s an amazing exercise for the brain using all parts of it and all senses, the mathematical part, the smell of the paint, the music affecting the overall mood of the project.

It’s one thing to look at, analyze, and appreciate a painting, but it’s a whole other thing to analyze it with your hands and your own artistic skill…

…and the difference between me and those PHILISTINES I just mentally screamed at into the uncaring void above in item 4, is that when I deconstruct a part of our culture, I aim to analyze it, learn from it, then build it back up again maybe just a little more new, yet maintaining respect and integrity for the original.

It took me too long to realize that THEY only want to destroy. Their “deconstruction” serves not to create, not to learn, but to DESTROY!

… On that note, I’m going to go back to painting. Maybe turn on some heavy metal. This ought to yield some interesting results.

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